Friday, 10 April 2015

Learning Money

Well, it's been busy! I'm sorry for not keeping up with blogging regularly.

We've been learning all about Canadian coins since the March Break. I've actually continued the probability unit and started fractions as well - all accommodated through my BUILD Math centres. Here's what my BUILD bins contain:

B - Buddy Games - Counting Coins: Gardening Edition (adding pennies, nickels, and dimes)
Students use a die to make their way through the board game, collecting the coins they land on. The person with the most money when they reach the end wins! We may be getting a class bunny over the weekend, so the kids were super excited to see rabbits on our board game (pure coincidence!).

 Counting Coins - Gardening Edition, adding pennies, nickels, and coins

U - Using Manipulatives - These are my Easter egg coin identification activities. On one side of the plastic Easter egg, I have the name of the coin. On the other side, I have the value. Inside, I have a plastic or paper representation of the coin. Students open the eggs, empty them out, and mix them up ... then put them all back together! PRO TIP: store these in an empty egg carton! I have two sets: an easy one (the colours match up - so for example, the pennies will have all-pink eggs, dimes all-yellow eggs, etc.) and a difficult (the colours don't match, so the eggs will be two-coloured once matched up).

 Easter Egg Money Identification

I - Independent Math - Here, students work in their JUMP Math workbooks. They have a choice between Money, Fractions, or Probability. They're making the connection between money and fractions and also fractions and probability. I really like having all of these strands "alive." To make my life easier, I made some papers and put them in the bin which tell kids which pages to do for each section - and reminds them to date stamp their page!

L - Learning Numbers - I have a fractions sorting/matching activity by Mrs. Beattie's Classroom that she so graciously gave away as a flash freebie earlier this week. She's my TPT mentor and former teaching next-door-neighbour, so I always look forward to using her products. Students have three categories to sort pictures of fractions into (both circle and rectangular representations): more than 1/2, equal to 1/2, and less than 1/2. It's great for my 1s to begin comparing fractions and perfect for my grade 2s to start relating and comparing fractional pieces.

 Beginning Fractions - Mrs Beattie's Classroom

I also found an old fractions game when I inherited my classroom. It seems to be some sort of spinner game - probably designed for older grades, but we don't use the spinner game portion. Students enjoy making the pie in several ways and exploring fractional sizes. They're also using fraction language all by themselves!

 Fractions Are As Easy As Pie

I've also put a "clothesline" for skip counting on my huge, beautiful window. I used a hot glue gun to put plastic hooks on either side of the window and one right on the window (because it sags when all the numbers and clothespins are put on). I wrote the numbers, counting by 5s, to 100 and put the cards in random order one day. My little guys figured out the activity all on their own - and it's quite popular!

 Skip Counting Clothesline

D - Doing Math - Here, students use paper money manipulatives to represent money amounts under supervision of either myself or our peer tutor from the high school (a benefit of being a K-12 school!). There are a few variations of this activity in my Canadian Money product - including the paper manipulatives.

 Canadian Money - by Miss Laidlaw's Classroom

Happy springtime!

- Miss Laidlaw